Non-invasive cardio-pulmonary monitor for mice

Period of Performance: 09/15/2006 - 07/31/2007

$380K

Phase 2 SBIR

Recipient Firm

Empirical Technologies Corporation
P.O. Box 8175
Charlottesville, VA 22906
Principal Investigator

Research Topics

Abstract

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The results of the Phase I effort, during the course of which the physiological signals of eight mice were determined and correlated with established "golden standard" techniques, have demonstrated the feasibility of monitoring and identifying clearly distinguishable physiological signals by measuring the mouse's chest movements with a saddle-type sensor. More importantly, the results clearly established that this sensor can answer the need for the long-term and continuous monitoring of mobile mice, particularly those animals whose state of health is so precarious as a result of genetic intervention and age that invasive monitoring means are not an option. As part of the Phase II effort the system will be miniaturized so that the entire sensing assembly can be moved onto the mouse and a miniature wireless transmission system will be integrated into the sensor system. The real-time signal processing algorithms will be optimized and a computer-based graphical user interface (GUI) completed. In order to validate the performance of the sensing system, two studies will be performed at the University of Virginia on mouse populations whose fragile state of health does not permit invasive monitoring. One study will involve mice with inducible myotonic dystrophy, while the other will study asthmatic mice. An alliance has been formed with a well-known manufacturer of physiological monitoring equipment to commercialize the product. The need for the long-term monitoring of cardiopulmonary rhythms in mice is growing along with an increasing population of mice strains that are being used to test drug responses, genetic engineering attempts, and other factors that can affect these biological rhythms. This sensor technology can answer the need for the long-term and continuous monitoring of mobile mice, particularly those animals whose state of health is precarious as a result of genetic intervention and age that invasive monitoring means are not an option.