Ultrafast Scintillator for Dynamic Compression Studies

Period of Performance: 03/28/2016 - 10/27/2016

$150K

Phase 1 SBIR

Recipient Firm

Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc.
44 Hunt Street Array
Watertown, MA 02472
Firm POC
Principal Investigator

Abstract

The NNSA-sponsored development of the Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS), at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, will permit real-time X-ray measurements (diffraction, imaging, scattering) in dynamically compressed materials, and enable understanding of the dynamics of materials response to intense shock waves, which heretofore has not been possible. Such studies are critical for advancing DTRAs mission of creating new energetic materials or physical approaches that enhance the defeat of weapons of mass destruction by orders of magnitude. To fully utilize the potential of the DCS, we propose to develop an ultrafast (115,000 photons/MeV), high effective Z (59.7), high-efficiency, green emission (540 nm) scintillator for high spatial resolution time-resolved studies of condensed matter. The proposed scintillator, invented at RMD and patent-protected, is well-suited for fabricating large-area structured scintillators using vapor deposition technology. The material will be grown in a microcolumnar morphology which channels the scintillation light within its micron-size columns through total internal reflections towards the underlying detector, thereby minimizing the lateral light spread common to crystalline/non-structured scintillators. Thus, in addition to its fast response, excellent stopping power, and bright emission, the structured scintillator will overcome the traditional resolution-efficiency tradeoff, yielding high quantum detection efficiency. To fully utilize the potential of the DCS, we propose to develop an ultrafast (115,000 photons/MeV), high effective Z (59.7), high-efficiency, green emission (540 nm) scintillator for high spatial resolution time-resolved studies of condensed matter. The proposed scintillator, invented at RMD and patent-protected, is well-suited for fabricating large-area structured scintillators using vapor deposition technology. The material will be grown in a microcolumnar morphology which channels the scintillation light within its micron-size columns through total internal reflections towards the underlying detector, thereby minimizing the lateral light spread common to crystalline/non-structured scintillators. Thus, in addition to its fast response, excellent stopping power, and bright emission, the structured scintillator will overcome the traditional resolution-efficiency tradeoff, yielding high quantum detection efficiency