Nucleoside Phosphonate Analogs for the Treatment of Adenoviral Infection

Period of Performance: 05/15/2014 - 04/30/2015

$300K

Phase 1 SBIR

Recipient Firm

Tsrl, Inc.
Ann Arbor, MI 48108
Principal Investigator

Abstract

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Adenovirus can be a significant health risk for immune-compromised patients, both adult and pediatric patients. In pediatric patients in particular, complications associated with adenoviral infection include pneumonia, urinary infections and hepatitis. In the military setting, adenoviruses are endemic in Department of Defense basic recruit training installations and cause frequent epidemics of febrile respiratory disease. An adenovirus vaccine effective against types 4 and 7 is licensed by the FDA, but its future long-term availability is uncertain and there is no vaccine for the prevention of other adenovirus types, including type 14 which has caused fatal respiratory disease in basic recruits as well as in civilian populations. Currently, cidofovir is the only licensed drug that has shown efficacy against adenovirus infections. However, cidofovir can only be given intravenously and its use is further limited due to renal toxicity. Therefore, development and licensure of improved drugs to treat adenovirus infection is of high importance to the public health community. We have developed a platform technology designed to improve the oral absorption of the nucleotide phosphonate drugs, cidofovir (CDV) and HPMPA, such that they will be effective anti-adenoviral oral therapeutic agents. In the phase 1 portion of the project, we propose to synthesize a novel series of CDV and HPMPA prodrugs and evaluate their anti-adenoviral activity against a range of medically relevant adenoviral serotypes. These analogs will also be tested for their pharmacokinetic profile, including absorption and distribution. This work will lay the scientific foundation for development of an effective, oral agent against adenovirus that is implicated in acute respiratory disease and disseminating infection in immune-compromised individuals. For this project, we have established collaborations with Prof. Charles McKenna (analog design and synthesis) at the University of Southern California and Dr. Adriana Kajon (virological studies) at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute.